Country-pop singer-songwriter Caroline Jones on new single “Being A Woman (Is Like Being The Sun)”

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Photo by Tracy Alison
       

Today, country-pop singer-songwriter Caroline Jones debuted her new, upbeat Bluegrass track “Being A Woman (Is Like Being The Sun)” on CMT leading up to Mother’s Day next weekend! Pre-Save/Add Link here: https://found.ee/BeingAWoman

Track & Studio Video Released Ahead of
Mother’s Day; Watch CMT’s Premiere HERE
 

“Being A Woman (Is Like Being The Sun)” was written by Caroline, and features an incredible group of all-female Bluegrass musicians including GRAMMY Award-winning artist Alison Brown (producer/banjo), Rebecca Frazier (guitar/vocals), Kate Lee O’Connor (fiddle/harmony vocal), Mary Meyer (mandolin), and Missy Raines (bass). The song, which was recorded at Compass Studios in Nashville, is a unique telling of age-old truths of womanhood.

Jones filled us in on the inspiration behind the new single, the songwriting and recording process, the all-female bluegrass musicians that can accompany her, and some special lyrics she believes sums up womanhood.

Photo Credit: Tracy Alison

Tell us about the inspiration behind “Being A Woman (Is Like Being The Sun)”?

“Being a Woman (is Like Being the Sun)” is about the double-edged sword of emotional intelligence and sensitivity that comes with womanhood. There is immense, life-giving power in a woman’s care and understanding of the intricacies of others’ needs. But many challenges accompany that power. As I mature, I am learning how to navigate those challenges and trying to be intentional about the kind of woman I want to be. I had a vision to record this song with an all-female bluegrass band because I knew they could bring the lyrics to life in an authentic way. I am so grateful that Alison Brown resonated with this message, because I cannot think of a better producer to have at the helm for this song.

What was the songwriting and recording process?

This is one of those special songs that was written very quickly in one sitting — “fell out the sky,” as the phrase goes. I have been ruminating on womanhood for the past few years, especially as I enter into marriage and the next chapter of my life. I feel that this song had been gestating in my heart for quite some time, and one morning I was able to articulate my thoughts and feelings with a singular metaphor (the sun) that captures the sentiments really well. If you listen, you’ll notice there’s no bitterness or resentment in the song, even though there are challenges to being a woman. It’s about making peace with the gifts and the challenges of womanhood and helping both to be seen and understood.

What a great team of all-female bluegrass musicians you pulled together for this special song! Tell us about how this collaboration was formed.

I’ve looked up to Alison Brown as a musician, producer and businesswoman for years. I sent her this song and she really resonated with it. I told her my vision to record the song with an all-female bluegrass band and release it around Mother’s Day as a tribute to Mothers especially. She put together the band — Mary Meyer, Kate Lee O’Connor, Rebecca Frazier, and the legendary Missy Raines. The recording process was extremely special — we recorded the song and shot the video in the same day. I trusted that these women could bring this song to life in a way no one else could, and I was right! It is extremely difficult to get to that level of musicianship in any genre, let alone bluegrass, and to break in as a woman is very rare, so I can’t overstate my admiration for them.

The song has a special message and is being released just in time for Mother’s Day. Is there a particular lyric that speaks to you?

I am so proud of these lyrics; it’s really hard to choose. I really encourage people to sit with these lyrics…they run really deep for me. But I think the chorus lyric, “Every woman in the world knows it ain’t fair/But still we care/It’s just how we’re built like rivers run and trees make air/We make love” sums up womanhood really well. As a woman, especially a Mother (which I’m not yet), it’s very hard (and not the answer) to suppress your nature. You care so much, and that care sometimes goes unacknowledged or misunderstood, which can be very difficult. But still, caring is in our nature, like it is in a river’s nature to run. So learning how to care with integrity, with strength, with self-possession, and with wisdom is the call of a really powerful woman, which I strive to be.